University of California, Riverside

Department of Bioengineering



Research Focus Areas


Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine

Optical nano-materials; polymeric scaffolding; high-throughput screening; 3D biomaterials; 3D tissue engineered scaffolds and bioreactors; vascular nanotherapeutics, biodegradable implants

Anvari

Our lab focuses on fabrication, characterization, and translation of multi-functional optical materials for biomedical applications including intraoperative ovarian cancer imaging.

Freedman

Our lab uses biomimetic design principles to develop functional materials and interfaces for sensing, cell manipulation, and cell characterization.

Ghosh

We are developing instructive biomaterials to promote neovascularization and tissue regeneration, and understanding mechanical cues that regulate blood vessel formation and function in both health and disease.

Grover

We develop novel microfluidic devices for measuring the fundamental physical properties of biomaterials.  These physical properties offer unique insights into the biological and chemical.

Liu

Our mission is to understand cell-biomaterial and tissue-biomaterial interactions in 2D and 3D and to develop better tissue substitutes and medical implant materials using biodegradable.

Morgan

Using synthetic and natural polymers, our lab builds tissue-scale models of aging tissue to better understand and address tissue degeneration with age.

Nam

Modulation of stem cell functions via controlled microenvironments (scaffolding). We are also working on orthopaedic tissue engineering via mechanoactivation.

Liao

Our lab focuses on high-throughput screening for chemical probe discovery in stem cell pluoripotnecy and differentiation.

Rodgers

Signaling and cell functioning (collaboration with Masaru Rao) is a primary focus on our work with biomaterials.

Vullev

Our research focuses on surface chemistry, bioinert and biofunctional interfaces.

Biomedical Imaging

Optical coherence tomography; biophotonic technologies; non-invasive monitoring; image guided spectroscopy; optical neuroimaging; nonlinear optical microscopy and spectroscopy; MRI; neuroimaging

Anvari

In biomedical imaging our lab focuses on fabrication, characterization, and translation of multi-functional optical materials for biomedical applications including intraoperative ovarian cancer imaging.

Freedman

Our lab is interested in characterizing cells and individual molecules using electron microscopy tools such as SEM and TEM imaging systems. This includes using TEM tomography and elemental content imaging (EDS).

Hu

Our team focuses on MRI, neuroimaging, molecular imaging, and image processing in biomedical imagaing.

Morikis

Our research focuses on the development of fluorescence biomarkers for diagnosis of inflammatory eye diseases, using computational and experimental methods. We also work on protein and peptide structure and dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

Park

The Park lab develops optical imaging methods, largely based on optical coherence tomography, for non-contact and label-free visualization and quantification of the anatomy and function of neural structures.

Peters

Our research uses MRI, EEG, electrophysiology, and other neuroimaging to investigate the function of the brain at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

Rodgers

Confocal imaging, fluorescence imaging, TEMs, and SEMs are just a few of the areas we focus on in biomedical imaging.

Vulllev

Fluorescence markers for bacterial detection and identification and dynamic staining (we developed and introduced the concept of dynamic staining), are just two areas of how we are helping to advance biomedical imaging.

Computational Bioengineering

Bioinformatics; modeling of biomolecular structure, dynamics and interactions; protein and peptide design; crowded protein osmotic pressure; modeling of cellular signaling pathways; image processing and analysis; computational drug discovery

Chartron

We aim to computationally model the network of factors mediating protein maturation and secretion in eukaryotes. We use these models to improve the diversity and yield of industrially or pharmaceutically significant proteins by guiding the design of production strains and gene sequences.

Freedman

Our lab has experience in the bioinformatic analysis of DNA sequencing data (Illumina and Pacbio), nanopore-based DNA sequencing data, as well using computational methods to model nanofluidic architectures.

Grover

Microfluidic devices are typically designed by hand using trial and error, a slow and laborious process. We want to vastly accelerate this process by "evolving" optimal designs for microfluidic devices on computers. By combining sophisticated fluid flow simulations with algorithms from computer science, we hope to evolve diagnostic "chips" that significantly outperform their human-designed counterparts.

Morikis

Our research focuses on computational modeling of biomolecules and biomolecular interactions, structural and translational bioinformatics, in silico protein, peptide and drug design, pharmacophore-based virtual screening, and systems biology quantitative modeling.

Rodgers

Systems biology approach to understanding cancer cell susceptibility to ascorbate therapy. Mathematical modeling of crowded protein systems. Feedback analysis of signaling processes in hunger circuitry. Transport characteristics of free fatty acids across the epithelium.

Neuroengineering

Modeling of the neural system; processing of neurophysiological signals and neuroimaging data; modulation and intervention of the neural system; engineering of devices, constructs, and therapeutics for treating brain disorders

Freedman

Our lab is interested in applying single molecule methods to probe the pathogenesis of neurological disease. By looking at the kinetic processes involved in the early stages of a disease, insights into better diagnostics and drug discovery are possible.

Hu

Dr. Hu’s group is modeling the brain and assessing brain modulation using understandings of the brain obtained from neuroimaging. In addition, aided by neuroimaging imaging, his group is developing methods for brain computer interface and machine learning. Furthermore, his group is also interested in applying control theory to understand the functions of neural circuits.

Liu

Our team focus on biodegradable materials for neural repair and stimulation.

Morikis

We are interested in the role of the complement system and other inflammatory responses in neurodegenerative disorders.

Park

A number of transient structural changes have been known to accompany action potential propagation but, outside of a change in membrane potential, have been difficult to detect. The Park lab has developed multiple collaborations to develop an optical electrode based on the high speed and exquisite sensitivity of optical interferometry for label-free detection of these transient changes.

Peters

The Peters lab uses computational and probabilistic modeling and neural stimulation to investigate how the brain produces complex and adaptive outputs under uncertainty.

Rodgers

Professor Rodgers' research involves reducing edema in cerebral and spinal cord injury. Direct transport mechanisms for neuroprotective drug delivery to cerebral and spinal cord tissue.

Molecular and Cellular Engineering

Cellular biomechanics; mechanotransduction; signal transduction pathways; regulation of immune system; vascular inflammation; metabolic controls; intracellular biosensors; biomolecules/biomolecular interactions

Anvari

Our lab is dedicated to understanding the biophysical mechanisms that underlie membrane-based energy transduction.

Chartron

We investigate how cells act as systems that can assemble an enormous diversity of proteins. Using this knowledge, we engineer cells with increased abilities for making proteins in order to improve metabolic engineering, industrial protein preparation, and to lower the cost of biopharmaceuticals.

Freedman

Our lab designs, characterizes, and employs micro and nanotechnology for high-resolution biological sensing. Through the development of new tools, we hope to explore biological systems at the cellular and molecular level.

Ghosh

We identify mechanical cues that regulate blood vessel formation and function in both health and disease.

Grover

We develop novel microfluidic devices for measuring the fundamental physical properties of cells. The mass, volume, and density of single cells change during important cellular processes like growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, so our measurements offer unique insights into the biological state of a cell. The instruments we develop have applications in many different fields, including diagnostics, environmental monitoring, pharmaceuticals, and forensics.

Liao

We are developing FRET assays for quantitative system biology, FRET-based protein interaction and enzymatic kinetics determinations, and high throughput screening for drug discovery.

Morikis

We perform molecular-level studies of immune system function and regulation, design of immune system proteins and regulators with tailored physicochemical properties and biological function, and rational drug design for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

Nam

Our research with molecular and cellular engineering involves understanding the mechanobiology of orthopaedic tissues in health or disease.

Morgan

As tissues age, their constituent cells undergo many molecular changes that contribute to the aging process. We utilize a number of viral and transient genetic tools to modify cell behavior and understand the influence of individual cells on the aging of the whole tissue.

Rodgers

Dynamics of endothelial and epithelial cell signaling relative to transport-based cues.

More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Department Information

Department of Bioengineering
205 Materials Science & Engineering

Hours: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tel: (951) 827-4303
Fax: (951) 827-6416
E-mail: big@engr.ucr.edu

Potential Undergraduate Students:
Undergraduate Admissions

Potential Graduate Students:
Professor Victor G. J. Rodgers

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